Volusia Homeowners Try to Strengthen Their Homes After Hurricanes

As the wreckage of several homes cascades over a sand cliff and others that hang over the edge of Wilbur-by-the-Sea, just three miles from the coast, Daytona Beach Shores is also bracing for the possibility of problems. “It’s devastating. Devastating and heartbreaking,” Mayor Nancy Miller said. “We have some properties that are at risk.” Owner John Reny is now taking a closer look at his battered beachfront property. His heart goes out to his neighbors on the shore. “I feel terrible. My wife feels terrible,” Reny said. they went down to 15 feet. ‘It’s pretty catastrophic,’ he said. ‘We’re worried that if we don’t get something right away, we’ll be like Wilbur-by-the-Sea. The ocean don’t forgive.” Now it’s a race against time and against Mother Nature. This week, Reny is working with the city, county, and state to try to get a permit for a temporary fix: using bags of sand to shore up their property to prevent further erosion of the beach. “Our house that was here was built in 1925. This family had owned this land forever. And who would have ever dreamed in their dreams of crazier than that was going to happen. I wouldn’t have done it,” he said. Reny hopes av Have the sandbags in place next week at the latest. And from there, he said his goal would be to find a permanent solution as a community. “We are all working together to try to find a viable long-term solution for everyone,” he said.

As the wreckage of several homes cascades over a sand cliff and others that hang over the edge of Wilbur-by-the-Sea, just three miles from the coast, Daytona Beach Shores is also bracing for the possibility of problems.

“It’s devastating. Devastating and heartbreaking,” Mayor Nancy Miller said. “We have some properties that are at risk.”

Owner John Reny is now taking a closer look at his battered beachfront property. His heart goes out to his neighbors on the shore.

“I feel terrible. My wife feels terrible,” Reny said.

Before hurricanes Ian and Nicole, Reny had 150 feet of vegetated dunes that stretched out to the ocean from her back patio. Now they are down to 15 feet.

“It’s quite catastrophic,” he said. “We’re worried that if we don’t get something straight away we’ll be like Wilbur-by-the-Sea. The ocean does not forgive.

Now it’s a race against time and against Mother Nature. This week, Reny is working with the city, county and state to try to get a permit for a temporary solution: to use sandbags to shore up his property to further prevent beach erosion.

“Our house here was built in 1925. This family has owned this land forever. And who would have ever dreamed in their wildest dreams that this was going to happen. I wouldn’t have done it,” he said.

Reny hopes to have the sandbags in place by next week at the latest. And from there, he said his goal would be to find a permanent solution as a community.

“We are all working together to try to find a viable long-term solution for everyone,” he said.